5 Steps to accessing home care
5 Steps to accessing home care

Industry news

5 Steps to accessing home care is a guide to help consumers navigate the home care sector. The guide is published by the Dept of Social Services and was released on 1 Sept this year.

This publication is supported by a range of checklists for consumers that assist them in asking the right questions of providers. These checklists are available from the Home Care Today website.

Aged care providers would do well to review these checklists and audit their services and consumer information packs to ensure they address all the key points identified in the checklists.


Quality Indicators for Aged Care – have you been alerted to this national trail of consumer led quality indicators. This pilot being co-ordinated by KPMG is focussed on residential providers. A pilot fact sheet is also available.

Throughout the pilot the National Aged Care Alliance (NACA) Reference Group will provide advice on the development and implementation of QIs for residential aged care facilities.

An update on the pilot was recently published on the LASA Vic website which is well worth a read to keep abreast of what could potentially be a new quality system for aged care.


In the general news

virtual doctor is in

Is this the end of traditional doctors? A third of over 65s use technology to manage their health – is technology challenging the way in which older people are getting medical support. The UK, like Australia, has a GP shortage and increasing pressure of health services.

“a third of all over 65s now use a gadget or some form of technology to manage their health”

It seems we are increasingly wiling to search and share information online about our personal health signs and symptoms in the search for information. The increase in health trackers/wearables also adds to this trend.

“health searches in the UK increased by 19% = an average of 848,820 searches a month.”

All of which leads to the emerging role for ‘virtual doctors’. This technology is being used in Australia for remote communities but more and more it might become part of our health solutions.


How the ‘smart age’ could revolutionize old age – Keeping with the technology theme this story introduces us to Roby Mini and the role of robotics in aged care in China.

Roby Mini may be the saviour for the very old who are alone. China is expected to produce 200,000  Roby Mini’s this year for sale at $631.

The need for Roby Mini is expected to grow as China’s smaller family structures fails to keep up with caring for their elderly family members.

“Roby Mini, which can record activity, order groceries and provide entertainment, has been specifically designed for use by elderly people, especially those who live alone.”

Roby Mini’s primary function is as a “companion” and an automated “reminder” of appointments and chores to be attended to. The robot can understand dialects and has 360 degree wheels for manoeuverability, face recognition and tracking and can play music and provide weather reports.


Photo series of seniors shattering every ageing stereotype - Firstly a caveat - this is an 'old' story but I've only come across it this week. This story reaffirms the view that ageism is alive despite being focussed on shattering stereotypes. It appears that any image of an older person 1) taking risks, 2) being active and 3) engaged in unconventional activities creates interest and generates provocative news headlines.  It's great to see stereotypes challenged like this but these stories are also why we need to tackle ageism.
Huffington Post

Photo series of seniors shattering every ageing stereotype – Firstly a caveat – this is an ‘old’ story but I’ve only come across it this week.

This story reaffirms the view that ageism is alive despite being focussed on shattering stereotypes.

It appears that any image of an older person 1) taking risks, 2) being active and 3) engaged in unconventional activities creates interest and generates provocative news headlines.

It’s great to see stereotypes challenged like this but these stories are also why we need to tackle ageism.

The photographic series comes from a book titled ‘The Age of Happiness’ by Vladimir Yakovlev a journalist and photographer who wanted to explore and as a result chronicled ageing and came up with a new philosophy of age and happiness.

I should stress that the book is an exploration of the positive journey of ageing and how we each approach it differently to achieve personal happiness.